Written by Paisley Tedder

7 ways to get your garden ready for spring

As we get closer to being able to entertain outside, it’s time to get our spring gardens ready for entertaining.

Image: Barker and Stonehouse

Warmer weather, brighter evenings, lush lawns and colourful flower beds are all on the way, but most importantly the prospect of seeing friends and family outdoors. After a long few months of lockdown, the idea of socialising again fills us with real joy, but before we welcome our loved ones into our spring gardens and patios we need to make sure they’re in great condition. Luckily, we have the expert advice from Dobbies to ensure your garden is set for spring entertaining, so you can enjoy the time spent reuniting with loved ones from the 29th March.

1. Sort out the shed

wooden garden shed - top tips for organising your garden shed - garden - goodhomesmagazine.com

Image: Cuckooland

During the winter, these outdoor caves are usually left in a mess as we abandon our gardens for indoor pursuits. It’s important to check that power tools are working, repairing anything broken and generally tidying up. When you have jobs to do later you’ll be grateful that you took the time to do this, trust us!

Read more: Top tips for organising your garden shed

2. Invest in storage

If you don’t have a shed, a garden can quickly get cluttered and messy. Particularly if you’re storing bikes, tools and other household debris that may have accumulated during numerous lockdown clear outs of the home. Even if you have a small garden, the right storage will resolve this issue. Look for garden benches which double up as storage boxes, outdoor boot racks and cushion boxes that will keep furniture cushions protected in wet weather.

3. Sweep up

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Image: Unsplash

It’s easy to let pathways and decking get coated with leaves and other garden debris during the colder months, but now is the time to clear the area. If a broom isn’t sufficiently doing the job, invest in a pressure washer to help get rid of stubborn mess. Try to keep your lawn clear to avoid dead patches, and brush or rake over grass to remove any dead foliage ready for your spring garden.

4. Don’t forget flower beds and borders

Hoe your garden borders to remove weeds, feed them with fertiliser and apply a thick layer of mulch to help keep future weeds away is a great start. It’s also the perfect time of year to plant new additions to the garden, so get sowing those seeds!

5. Decide how you want your garden to look, and get going

Spring garden potted plants outdoors, goodhomesmagazine.com

Image: Wayfair

Hanging baskets, patio pots, trestles for vines to grow round? These will all contribute to making your spring garden a stunning haven and now is the time to invest. While the weather isn’t as warm as it will be, it’s better to plan ahead before everyone gets on the bandwagon. Even if you have limited outdoor space you can still create something beautiful. Find out which way your garden faces and how much sun it gets in the daytime to determine the best plants to get.

6. Prepare for eating alfresco

Image: Barker and Stonehouse

It’s looking like from 29th March until May we will only be allowed to entertain another household outdoors, so dining plans for Easter and other upcoming spring events will have to be done outside. This means investing in an outdoor table and seating area if you have space, and possibly a BBQ or pizza oven if you’d like to go the extra mile. If you’ve already got the garden dining attire you require, make sure it’s been wiped down, but if you need to invest in a new set try to pick something that can be folded away or stackable to save space.

How are you getting your outdoor area ready for entertaining and the Spring season? Tweet us @goodhomesmag, or post a comment on our Facebook page!

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